September 26th, 2016

Mum lied to jump housing queue

Mum lied to jump housing queue Mum lied to jump housing queue

AN EVESHAM woman who lied about being homeless in order to jump the housing waiting list has been fined hundreds of pounds.

Lynne Bott, 23, of Twyford, appeared at Worcester Magistrates Court on October 1 where she pleaded guilty by post to supplying false information.

The mother of one made an application in March to Wychavon District Council claiming she and her son had been living with a friend in Sedgeberrow, but said she could no longer live there because animals in the house were affecting her son’s health.

When discrepancies were found in her application, Bott claimed she was being made homeless within four to six weeks as her friend was moving someone else in.

However, when housing officers turned up at the property in Sedgeberrow her friend said Bott had not lived there for more than a year.

She was later interviewed under caution and admitted lying in order to speed up her application process.

It turned out Bott had been living with friends in Evesham, sleeping on the sofa in a one bedroom flat and claimed to have no relationship with her son’s father and had never lived with him.

When housing officers saw Facebook posts by Bott they found she was in a relationship with the father who lived in Twyford. Health visitors also confirmed they had always visited that address to see her and her son.

In a statement to the court she said she was sorry for the trouble she had caused but had done it for her son and had not believed it would go as far as it did.

Bott was ordered to pay £200 for two counts of supplying false information, as well as £585 in costs and a £20 victim surcharge.

Elaine Salter, Housing Services Manager for Wychavon District Council, said: “Social housing is in short supply in Wychavon and it is important the housing that does become available is allocated to those with the greatest need.

“When people misrepresent their circumstances in order to improve their chances of being allocated a house, it could deny the opportunity to someone who needs it more.”

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