September 29th, 2016

Evesham remembers Lincoln legacy

Evesham remembers Lincoln legacy Evesham remembers Lincoln legacy
Updated: 5:14 pm, May 06, 2015

THE LEGACY of an assassinated American President has been chronicled by the current Mayor of Evesham, 150 years after the town expressed its condolences.

Coun Charlie Homer followed in the footsteps of former Mayor Thomas White who wrote to the grieving nation in 1865 following the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

Lincoln was shot on April 14, 1865 by John Wilkes Booth at the Ford’s Theatre and after remaining in a coma for nine hours, died on April 15.

Members of Evesham Town Council voted to express their outrage at the atrocity at a meeting on May 3, 1865.

The letter proposed by Mayor Thomas White and seconded by Mr Alderman Burlingham asked councillors to share their indignation at the assassination.

“An expression of their feelings should be conveyed to the Government and People of the United States and an assurance of sympathy to the family of the late President.” the letter read.

“Our Town Clerk do cause of copy of their resolution to be approved and forwarded to the Minister of the United States in London.” it added.

And now to mark the 150th anniversary of the tragedy, the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum wrote to the Town Council to ask for reflections on the late President’s legacy.

In his letter, Coun Homer wrote: “We all know the huge achievements that President Lincoln accomplished as the 16th President of the United States. Most notably was the abolition of slavery.

“President Lincoln stood up for his beliefs and during the Gettysburg Address in 1863 clearly stated all men are created equal.

“That simple statement, which we are all equal and conceived in liberty is a lesson that we have all learned from.

“Here in Evesham we welcome all nationalities to our town. Famed for our market gardening heritage, we are blessed to have many migrant workers.

“Mostly from Eastern Europe they come home to find a better way of life for themselves and their families.

“All citizens of our town are protected by out laws and have freedom of speech which I believe, President Lincoln would be proud of.” he added.

Coun Homer also referenced Simon de Montfort in his letter and said both he and President Lincoln ‘fought for democracy, equality and liberty – all values preserved to this day’.

Both letters will now be on display as exhibits in the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Museum, in a published volume of selected letters and online at www.citizenlincoln.org

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